Barcelona: Sagrada Familia and More
September 4



In the morning of our first full day in Barcelona we purchased tickets to get inside La Sagrada Familia.
The earliest available time was at 1:30 that afternoon, so we went first to see a Gaudí-designed residence
called Casa Milà (a.k.a. La Pedrera).  After browsing the neighborhood and the gift shop we walked north
on Passeig de Grácia to the junction with Avinguda Diagonal, where we caught the underground to the
Sagrada Familia metro stop, at the corner of Carrer de Provença and Carrer de la Marina.

If you are familiar with Spanish you may notice that the street names in the preceding sentence do not
quite fit the Spanish language pattern.  That's because Barcelona is historically and proudly part of Catalonia,
a region with its own language and customs (and active separatist movement).




Come up out of the metro stop, turn around, and there is the Sagrada Famlia, easily viewed because,
on this side at least, it is bounded by wide streets and a park. Note that it is still under construction,
as it has been for more than 130 years (beginning in 1882).  Completion is planned for 2026,
the centennial of Antoni Gaudí's death.




Laura and Shannon next to the duck pond in the park (Plaça de Gaudí) across the street from the
Sagrada Familia. Behind them is the northeast entrance of the cathedral, the Nativity Façade,
with its four dramatic towers.  The actual main entrance, as yet uncompleted, will be
on the end to the left, and will have four similar towers.


Other Picture Sets:
Europe Month Home Page...
Bordeaux
Bilbao
Barcelona
This Page
Parque Güell
Montpellier
Paris
England
SE Ireland
SW Ireland




A closeup of the Nativity Façade.  Around the doors, above and on the sides, are dark green
metal vines with red ladybugs, one indicator of Gaudí's desire to include elements of nature in
his designs (sorry, no closeup closeup available).




The ceiling over the nave inside the cathedral.  The columns branch out in imitation of trees.
The red-orange of the lower portion (the west side of the cathedral) is the dominant color of the
stained glass windows.




The west corner of the cathedral, with the Passion Façade at the base of the towers.




Casa Milà,also known as La Pedrera, one of Gaudí's residential buildings.




Casa Battló, center right, Gaudí's contribution to the Block of Discord.  Much of the front façade
is decorated with ceramic tiles.  More about the Block of Discord on the next page.




      The pictures of this trip are divided into several sets:

      One: London to Bordeaux.

      Two: Art in Bilbao.

      Three: The First of Barcelona.

      Four: This page ...

      Five: Gaudi Out and More.

      Six: Montpellier.

      Seven: Cathedral Paris.

      Eight: London Bath.

      Nine: Irish Castles.

      Ten: Rocks and Rivers.


      The Month in Europe Home page.